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Barangaroo Ngangamay – a multimedia experience

 

Barangaroo Reserve has become a hotspot for Sydneysiders and tourists to take in the stunning harbour-side views from the parklands on the city’s western foreshore.

But what do visitors know of Barangaroo, the strong and influential Cammeraygal woman, and the cultural significance of the headland?

Barangaroo Ngangamay (Barangaroo Dreaming), a multimedia artwork created by renowned Aboriginal multi-media artists Amanda Jane Reynolds and Genevieve Grieves, seeks to enrich the experience of visitors to the parklands and to share Barangaroo’s story.

“Barangaroo Ngangamay is an honouring of the ancestor, the Old Lady Barangaroo. It’s an offering by all the women coming together, and a sharing of culture with everyone who’d like to come down here to the reserve,” Amanda Jane Reynolds said.

The Barangaroo Ngangamay app uses AR (augmented reality) technology to bring to life the ancient stories of strength, diversity and creativity in a modern context.

Almost a year in the making, the artists worked closely with local Aboriginal women and men to deepen their knowledge of the area’s significance, working collaboratively with local communities: sharing stories, songs and traditions.

The result is an immersive and authentic Aboriginal cultural experience, using modern technology to show visitors the deep and ongoing connections Aboriginal people of Sydney have to the landscape.

As the user wanders the parklands, the app charts their location and reveals stories, song cycles, and language embedded within sandstone engravings, hand-carved by Aboriginal elders. The engravings act as a key to unlock five short films depicting the life cycles of the sun, moon and Indigenous women, that automatically play on approach.

Genevieve Grieves said it is exciting to capture stories and share culture using AR technology, making Indigenous stories more accessible to the broader community.

“That’s why Amanda and I do this work, because we see opportunities to create understanding, to build bridges, to bring people together,”  “Because we believe very much in shared history. We all belong to this history. All of us.” she said.

Find out more or download the app for apple or android.

Do you know an individual or organisation using technology to capture stories and share culture. Nominate them for the IDX Awards Culture and Country category here. IDX Awards celebrating Indigenous Digital Excellence. 

(Photo credit: Barangaroo)

 

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  1. Pingback: National Reconciliation Week – Celebrating the use of technology to share culture. | IDX Awards 2017

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